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Research Guides

Database Tutorials

Introduction

Discovery is the newly updated search box on the library homepage (as of about December 10, 2020). Like its predecessor, it searches across most of our collections--print and electronic--including the Library Catalog and many of our article databases. See "What Is and Isn't Included?", below, for more details.

You'll notice the different look of the interface, but it functions in a very similar way to our previous search. View the different tabs below, or watch the screencast overview and demo, to learn more about how to use Discovery.

If you would like to try out Discovery before it goes live on the library homepage, use the search box below:


 
Limit to: audio

 


How to Use Discovery

How do I find a book in Discovery?

On the library homepage, you can use the search box to locate a book. You have the option to search by content type: articles, books, videos, audio, and only items within Geisel's catalog. Type in your search terms/author/title, check the box to limit to Books, and the box to limit results to items in the catalog (if you wish), and hit enter. 

Discovery search with Books and Catalog boxes checked

Once you hit enter, you will be presented with a results page that fits your basic search terms.

If you do not immediately see the book you are searching for, you can either scroll down the page to see if it is within the first several returns, or you can use limiters on the left side of the screen (1.) to narrow down the results by date, format, and location (if it is in our collection, available online, etc.)

Once you have found the book you are looking for, on the right of the entry (2.) you can choose to link, cite, email, save (if you are logged into a Discovery account) or export the reference to a reference manager (i.e. RefWorks, EasyBib).

Alternatively, you can click on the blue highlighted title (3.) which will bring you to a page with more information about the title (4.).

It will also tell you its availability in the library catalog (if we own it) and its call number (5.) so that you can locate it within our stacks. If it is an eBook to which we have access, you will be provided with a link to bring you to the book (be sure if you are off campus that you are logged in through Citrix). From this detailed page, you can cite, save and share the article, as well as request it through interlibrary loan (ILL) (6.) if it is not available at our library. Some books may even include links to book reviews at the bottom of this page (7.).

How do I find an article and full text articles?

On the library jomepage, you can use the search box to find relevant articles for your research. You have the option to search by content type and limit your search to just journal articles. Type in your search terms/author/title, check the Articles box, and hit enter. 

screenshot of Discovery search with Articles box checked

Once you hit enter, you will be presented with a results page that fits your basic search terms.

If you do not immediately see the articles you are searching for, you can either scroll down the page to see if something of relevance is within the first several returns, or you can use limiters on the left side of the screen (1.) to narrow down the results by date, format, location (if it is in our collection, peer reviewed, full text available, etc.)

Once you have found the article(s) you are looking for, on the right of the entry (2.) you can choose to link, cite, email, save (if you are logged into a Discovery account) or export the reference to a reference manager (i.e. RefWorks, EasyBib). 

For some entries, you may have to click a link to search for a full-text copy of the article (4.), or it will be listed as a hyperlink below the entry (5.).

Alternatively, you can click on the blue highlighted title (3.) which will bring you to a page with more information about the title (6.).


If you click on the "Find Full Text" link and you land on a page that looks like the one below (7.), it means that our library does not have access to it, but we may still be able to get you the article if you request it through our Interlibrary Loan (ILL).


Some online vendors will provide suggestions of other articles related to your topic that might be of interest to you (8.). This is a great way to find other relevant materials for your search.

Saving and Formatting Sources and Citations

It's important that as you search, you keep track of the sources that you want to use for your research. There are a number of ways to do this in order to make sure that you can get back to the resources you just spent time locating.

Permalink

On both the search results page, and on the detailed information page for a selected item, you will see a small chain symbol located usually to the left of the screen. Clicking on this link will provide you with a Permalink (1) that you can copy and paste into bookmarks or a notes file. Unlike the URL, this link will bring you back to the file within the database. If you only copy the URL, once you close the search browser and/or log off, the URL link will not bring you back to the article. Be sure to copy the Permalink.


Cite this Source/Item

If you prefer to copy and paste citations directly from the item to a bibliography, you can click on the quotations symbol (2). This will bring up a box or drop menu (3) from which you can choose your required style of citations (i.e. APA, Chicago, MLA, etc.). A preview of the citation format will be displayed (4) which you can either copy, or choose to export to a reference management system (see below for more details). Always double check these citations - sometimes they do not exactly follow the rules of the styles, and may need adjustments for your own bibliography.


Options for Export to a Reference Manager

Click on the three dots (5) or an Export To/As link to export the citation to a reference management program.

A reference management program - such as RefWorks, EndNote, EasyBib, Zotero, BibTeX and Citavi - is a valuable tool during any research project. While some require a subscription, others are free. They allow you to to upload (export) citations into a searchable bibliography, and then use the program to help insert the references and citations into your papers as you use them, formatting a bibliography for you at the end. It is highly recommended that you establish your reference manager at the start of your research so all your information can be properly organized. This can simplify your writing and citation process down the road. 

 


Formatting Citations without Citation Tools

If there is no Citation generator available, or you have questions about the format of the citation that was generated, you can consult our Citing Sources tutorials. In there, you will find many of the most popular citation styles along with formatting instructions, examples of references for the most commonly used resources, and links to both online and print resources for more information. If you still have questions, the Reference Librarian will be happy to assist you.

Advanced Search Option

If you have more specific requirements for your search, such as a certain source type, an article within a certain time period, or a book written in a particular language, you can choose to do an Advanced Search. An Advanced Search will provide you with an already narrowed results field, rather than having to add limiters after a less defined search, saving yourself some time and and scrolling.

The Advanced Search allows you to select Fields (1) to search within, such as All Fields, Author, Title, Publication Title, Subject Terms, ISBN/ISSN, Series, etc. You can then augment your search using Boolean terms (2) such as AND and NOT (to limit) and OR (to expand) to increase or decrease the specificity of the returned results. You enter your search terms into the search bars (3). If you have more search terms, you can add more fields (4) so, for example, you could search by author, for a certain topic, and within a specific series or journal title.

If you have to find articles within a specific time period, you can set parameters so that only materials published during that time period are returned for your review (5).

Further, you can specify Content Type (6) (article, book, book review, map, paintings, etc.), Discipline (7) (your particular area of focus/scholarship), and Language (8)

You can also add limiters, such as ensuring the returns are peer reviewed (9), excluding particular types of materials (i.e. newspaper articles, etc.) (10), or asking the search to go beyond library resources (11)

 

Screencast: Discovery Overview & Demo

If the embedded video is not displaying (Firefox works best), or to see the audio transcript alongside the video, click the link below:

What Is and Isn't Included?

What's Included? What's Not Included?
  • Print and electronic books in the Library Catalog
  • Streaming video
  • Articles and other content from databases, such as:
    • All ProQuest databases
    • Some EBSCO databases
    • Access World News
    • ACS Academic Core
    • ARTstor
    • Brill
    • Elsevier
    • ERIC
    • HeinOnline (some collections)
    • JSTOR
    • MathSciNet
    • New York Times
    • Ovid
    • Oxford
    • Project MUSE
    • PubMed
    • SAGE
    • ScienceDirect
    • Taylor & Francis
    • Thomson Reuters Westlaw Campus Research
    • Wiley
  • Reference works from:
    • Britannica
    • Credo
    • Gale
    • Oxford
  • Some EBSCO content, such as:
    • America: History & Life
    • Criminal Justice Abstracts
    • Historical Abstracts
    • MLA International Bibliography
    • National Criminal Justice Reference Service Abstracts
    • New Testament Abstracts
    • Old Testament Abstracts
    • Philosopher's Index
    • PsycINFO
  • WorldCat
  • Primary resource collections, such as:
    • Roper iPoll
  • Certain discipline-specific databases, such as:
    • Birds of the World
    • Iter (a small fraction is in Discovery)
    • L'Année philologique
    • SciFinder
  • Business and market research databases, such as:
    • Mergent Online
    • Euromonitor Passport

*These lists are not exhaustive, but highlight some of the main inclusions and exclusions. For some of our databases, some but not all content is included in Discovery.

Feedback

If you have any feedback about Discovery, please email Laura Gricius-West at lgriciuswest@anselm.edu.