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Research Guides

Library & Research FAQs: Finding Articles

How do I get the full text of an article?

How do I get the full text of an article?

All our databases either have the full text of an article or provide you a way to find the full text elsewhere online, in a physical journal in our library, or through interlibrary loan.

  1. In Discovery, the search box on the library homepage, clicking the title of a search result will bring you to the full text when it's available online. When full text is not available online, an intermediary page will help you find it physically in the library or give you a link to request it through interlibrary loan.
  2. For other databases, check the database you're in to see if the full text is there. When you're in the record for an article you want, look for a link or button to full text or a PDF. Sometimes it is not very apparent.
    • Examples: HTML Full Text link​  ProQuest download PDF button   Wiley PDF icon
  3. If the full text is not in your original database, look for the WebBridge button WebBridge button. Clicking it will show a panel of results that may include:
    • Links to one or more databases where the full text is available.
    • A link to our library catalog, where you can check if we own a physical copy of the volume/issue you need.
    • A link to request it through interlibrary loan. Click the link to log in to your ILLiad account and submit an article request form.
  4. If you cannot find the full text, you can always request an article through interlibrary loan. If you didn't go through WebBridge, you can log in to your interlibrary loan (ILL) account from the library homepage. (Look for the Interlibrary Loan or My Accounts links.) Once you log in, click "Article" under the "Make New Request" menu on the left. Fill in the citation information and click Submit Request..

Alternatively, if you have the full citation, search the journal's name in Journal Finder to see if we have access to the year you need.

  • If we have the journal and necessary year in a database, click the link and browse to the proper year, volume, and issue to find your article.
  • If we only have a physical copy listed in the Library Catalog, ask at the Periodicals Desk on the Lower Level for help finding your article, and/or see our Periodicals Guide:

 

These steps still not working for you? Ask a librarian at the Reference Desk, or see our Research Guide on database tutorials for help finding full text from a specific database:

Where can I find scholarly articles?

Where can I find scholarly articles?

  • The Discovery search on our homepage search across many of our databases at once.
    • It contains articles (scholarly/academic, magazine, news), books, ebooks, and more.
    • To limit your search to just articles from scholarly journals:
      • Select the "Articles" checkbox below the library homepage search box.
      • Or, from within your search results, select Journal Article under the CONTENT TYPE list in the panel on the left. You could also select Scholarly / Peer Review under REFINE YOUR SEARCH in the same panel on the left.
  • Our full list of databases (also linked from our homepage) is searchable, and sortable by subject (e.g. Biology or Politics) and by type. You can use it to find databases relevant to your research topic.

database filters 

How can I tell if an article is scholarly?

How can I tell if an article is scholarly/academic?

Looking at several aspects of the article can help you determine if it's scholarly/academic.

Author

What are the author's credentials? Do they have an advanced degree? Are they a researcher/professor in the subject matter the article is about? 

If the author is a journalist or writer, they are probably writing for a more general audience rather than for scholars.

Journal

What does the journal specialize in, and what is it's audience? Scholarly journals often specialize in a specific research topic or range of topics, and their audiences are other scholars and students rather than the general public. However, some scholarly journals have very broad scopes; Science, for example, is a prestigious journal that publishes research in all areas of science.

Examples of scholarly/academic journals: Science, Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, Augustinian Studies, MIT Sloan Management Review. You should be able to find information about the scholarly journal on its website. It should have information about what it publishes, often called "Aims & Scope," and about its peer review.

References

How are the sources cited? 

  • All cited references have full citations. They might be in the form of footnotes at the bottoms of pages or a bibliography at the end of the article.
  • Academic articles have in-text citations (parenthetical or with superscript numbers)
  • In comparison, non-academic articles may just name people the author interviewed or give the title of a report mentioned in the text, but not the full citation.
Content

How specialized is the topic, and how is the article laid out?

  • Does the title say exactly what the article is about?
  • Is there jargon and subject-specific terminology?
  • Is there an abstract? (However, scholarly articles in the humanities often do not have abstracts.)
  • Are there figures like maps, charts, or graphs?

Want a second opinion? Feel free to ask a Librarian at the Reference Desk.

Where can I find news and magazine articles?

Where can I find news and magazine articles?

  • The Discovery search on our homepage searches across many of our databases at once.
    • It contains articles (scholarly/academic, magazine, news), books, ebooks, and more.
    • To limit your search to just articles from magazines and/or news sources, select Magazine Article and/or Newspaper Article from the CONTENT TYPE list in the panel on the left of your search results. You may need to click "More..." if you don't see those in the top few content type options.
  • Our full list of databases (also linked from our homepage) is searchable, and sortable by subject (e.g. Biology or Politics) and by type (choose Newspapers / Magazines). You can use it to find databases relevant to your research topic.

A-Z Databases newspapers and magazines filter

How can I find op-ed articles?

This FAQ will help you find op-eds / opinion articles from national newspapers using library resources.

NYTimes.com

Geisel Library provides you access to NYTimes.com. You'll need to create an account while on campus, and then you'll be able to log in from anywhere. Find the Opinion section in the top menu bar, and then you'll be able to browse by columnist or topic.

Newspapers in Library Databases

The library also has newspaper content in several library databases, usually as recent as the articles in today's print edition of the paper. Follow the directions below to find opinion articles from major U.S. newspapers: the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, and the Los Angeles Times.

Boston Globe

Click the link and then follow the steps below.

You'll see a landing page like this. Click Advanced Search.

Boston Globe landing page in ProQuest, with arrow pointing to Advanced Search link

From the Advanced Search page, "pubid(46045)" should be in the first search box. In the second search box, type "opinion" and choose "Section - SEC" from the dropdown menu next to it. Then click Search. Your results will be the most recent opinion articles in the Boston Globe.

screenshot of advanced search for "opinion" in the Section field

 

Wall Street Journal

Click the link below. You'll start on the Advanced Search page. All you need to do is type "opinion" in the search box and select "Section - SEC" from the drop-down menu.

The Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, and LA Times

Go to the database U.S. Newsstream, linked below. The same directions can be followed for each newspaper.

From the landing page, click Advanced Search, linked just below the title of the database (U.S. Newsstream).

screenshot of US Newsstream landing page with arrow pointing to Advanced Search link

In one box, type "opinion" and select "Section - SEC" from the drop-down menu next to it. In the other box, type the name of the newspaper (Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, or Los Angeles Times) and select "Publication title - PUB" from the drop-down menu. Click Search!

screenshot of US Newsstream search for "opinion" in Section field and "Los Angeles Times" in Publication Title field

I can't find what I'm looking for. How can I get better search results?

I can't find what I'm looking for. How can I get better search results?

For too few results, try:

  • Removing keywords from your search terms. Sometimes your search terms can be far too specific. Broadening your search by limiting the number of keywords you use can help you find relevant sources you might not have thought of looking for.
  • Adding synonyms to your search terms. If one of the main ideas in your research topics is teenagers, you might also search for teens and youth. Combine them in a search box like this: (teenagers OR teen OR teens OR youth)
  • Searching in a different database. Different databases have different sets of content and may search that content in different ways. If you can't find what you need in one database, you probably can find it in a different one.

For too many results, try:

  • Adding keywords to your search terms. If you're getting tons of results, you may need to narrow your topic and focus on a more specific aspect of it.
  • Filtering your results using the filters that are often on the left side of your database results list. Filter by date if you're looking for more recent sources, or by source type, for example if you want to focus on magazine articles to get more easily digestible sources.

Other search tips:

  • Do some background reading, using Google or a relevant library resource you've already found, to see what terms people are using to talk about your topic. Are you using them as search terms?
  • Use AND, OR, and NOT, along with parentheses to combine keywords
    • All terms connected with AND will show up in each of your results. Use these to connect different ideas.
    • At least one of each term connected with OR will show up in each of your results. Use these to connect synonyms.
    • No terms following NOT will show up in your results. Use this to exclude results you don't want.
    • Example: (youth OR teen) AND homelessness NOT runaway
  • Use quotation marks to search for a specific phrase. Example: "Runaway and Homeless Youth Act"
  • Use an asterisk to search for all possible endings of a root word. Example: homeless* will find homeless and homelessness

 

Still having trouble? Ask a librarian at the Reference Desk, or see our Research Guide on database tutorials for help with a specific database:

Where can I find help for using a specific database?

Where can I find help for using a specific database?

Check out our Research Guide for database tutorials, or ask a librarian at the Reference Desk.

How do I cite a scholarly article?

How do I cite a scholarly article?

That depends on which citation style you're using. Here are some examples:

MLA 8th

Brennan, Gillian E. "The Cheese and the Welsh: Foreigners in Elizabethan Literature." Renaissance Studies, vol. 8, no. 1, 1994, pp. 40-64. Wiley Online Library, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1477-4658.1994.tb00380.x.

APA 7th

Abben, D. R. (2015). Unlike the cheese, performance management does not stand alone. Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 8(1), 119-121. https://doi.org/10.1017/iop.2015.9

Chicago: Notes-Bibliography

Noblett, William. "Cheese, Stolen Paper, and the London Book Trade, 1750-99." Eighteenth-Century Life 38, no. 3 (Fall 2014): 100-110. ProjectMUSE.

CSE: Name-Year

Yeluri Jonnala BR, McSweeney PLH, Sheehan JJ, Cotter PD. 2018. Sequencing of the cheese microbiome and its relevance to industry. Front Microbiol [Internet]. [cited 12 July 2018];9:1020. Available from: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.01020

Ask a librarian at the Reference Desk, or see our Citing Sources research guide for more help:

How do I access library databases when I'm not on campus?

How do I access library databases when I'm not on campus?

Discovery (Main Library Search Box)

image of text "Off Campus? Log in to access full text atnd more content."When using Discovery from the library homepage, you will be able to log in after doing a search. From the search results page, click the “Off Campus? Log in to access full text and more content” link in the top right corner of the page.

Other Databases

Simply go to your desired database from our database list, or from the Find Articles tab of a Research Guide, and you'll be prompted to login. Once you have logged into one, you should be able to access others without logging in again. But eventually, your authentication will time out, and you'll need to log back in.

Log In Screen

Whether going through Discovery or a different database, you'll be prompted to log in on the standard Saint Anselm College log in screen that you see when logging into your SAC Outlook email or Canvas.

Log in with your Saint Anselm email and password. If you are already logged into your email or Canvas, you should not be prompted to log in again.

standard Saint Anselm College login page

Troubleshooting

If your question is not about the screen pictured above, please email the reference librarians at askanselm@anselm.edu.

In the meantime, you can also access library databases through Citrix. Just log into Citrix with your normal SAC username and password, open a browser there, and navigate to the library website, where you can then search as if you were on campus.

How do I find print periodicals or microform/microfilm/microfiche?

If we don't have the full text of an article online, sometimes we have a physical copy in the library--especially for older articles.  If the catalog record indicates the location as "Periodicals (Lower Level)," check for "LIBRARY HAS" to see which volumes and issues we have for that title:

screenshot of catalog record for The New Educator

If we have it in the normal print journal format, it may say "PAPER." Or it may say "MICROFILM," which you'll need to use our special scanner to read.

For more information on navigating our Periodicals collection, which contains print periodicals, microfilm, and microfiche, see our Periodicals Guide: