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Empirical Research: What is empirical research?

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What is empirical research?

Empirical research is based on observed and measured phenomena and derives knowledge from actual experience rather than from theory or belief. 

How do you know if a study is empirical? Read the subheadings within the article, book, or report and look for a description of the research "methodology." Ask yourself: Could I recreate this study and test these results?

Key characteristics to look for:

  • Specific research questions to be answered
  • Definition of the population, behavior, or phenomena being studied
  • Description of the process used to study this population or phenomena, including selection criteria, controls, and testing instruments (such as surveys)

Another hint: some scholarly journals use a specific layout, called the "IMRaD" format, to communicate empirical research findings. Such articles typically have 4 components:

  • Introduction: sometimes called "literature review" -- what is currently known about the topic -- usually includes a theoretical framework and/or discussion of previous studies
  • Methodology: sometimes called "research design" -- how to recreate the study -- usually describes the population, research process, and analytical tools
  • Results: sometimes called "findings" -- what was learned through the study -- usually appears as statistical data or as substantial quotations from research participants
  • Discussion: sometimes called "conclusion" or "implications" -- why the study is important -- usually describes how the research results influence professional practices or future studies

What about when research is not empirical?

Many humanities scholars do not use empirical methods. If you are looking for empirical articles in one of these subject areas, try including keywords like:

  • quantitative
  • qualitative
  • hypothesis
  • method
  • design
  • research

Also, look for opportunities to narrow your search to scholarly, academic, or peer-reviewed journals articles in the database.

 

Adapted from "Research Methods: Finding Empirical Articles" by Jill Anderson at Georgia State University Library.

See the complete A-Z databases list for more resources

Credits

The primary content of this guide was originally created by Ellysa Cahoy at Penn State Libraries.